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Ahmad Suradji: Sorcerer from Hell

Ahmad Suradji

Hearing the word maniac everyone quietly shudders at the thought of immense cruelty and paranoia. Psychologists say that murderers have serious mental disorders; largely their killings are closely connected with mental injuries sustained in childhood or congenital diseases.

Some of them have world fame. Of course, it is not the kind of fame anyone would want to have. Though some of maniacs are actually seeking for attention and the main purpose of their homicide is, oddly enough, to get this kind of prominence.

One of the most brutal and savage serial killers in the US history was Jeffrey Dahmer. During 13 years (1978-1991) this maniac, who had a doctorate in chemistry, killed 17 young men and boys. He was looking for his victims in bars and invited them to pose in the nude. When the victims agreed and came to his apartment, Dahmer pumped them with drugs, had sex with them and then strangled. He continued to have sex with already dead bodies, dismembered them, and had some body parts eaten. He also enjoyed drilling a hole in the head of a still living person with an electric drill. Dahmer was arrested by chance. On November 28, 1994 he was beaten to death by his cellmate.

There was another well-known monster, Ted Bundy, American serial killer, known also asas “Nylon killer.” His clothes always looked brand-new and was very friendly. But under the guise of a charismatic gentleman the face of cruel beast was hiding. From 1974 to 1978, he had kidnapped and murdered 30 young women. Experts argue that there were more victims on his conscience. He often pretended to be disabled or asked potential victims about a little help. He often entered the house at night and killed sleeping women. Then had sex with them, dismembered their bodies, taking some “souvenirs” with him – the heads of the victims. Bundy was electrocuted in January 1989.

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Ed Gein was a maniac who committed only two murders of women. However, their cruelty and sadistic fanatism shocked all of America. Dead bodies were dismembered, gutted as animal carcasses, and then used as a kind of “decoration” in the house. When the police broke into his house they found a terrible collection –the maniac had been secretly digging graves of recently deceased young women to bring the bodies at home for a few years. Then he took off their skin and sewed clothes; severed heads were hanging on the walls. The court found the murderer insane and Gein spent the rest of his days in a mental hospital, where he died on July 26, 1984.

These people shocked almost everyone if not everyone with their cruelty and atrociousness. All of these men had something in common. All of them were quite well-respected or had enough trust from the people. People were killed not because they were not smart enough to figure out they were dealing with monsters, but because the monsters were so good in disguise that no one could ever see the dark parts of their souls. And they personally did not see their actions as crimes. None of them ever thought about their actions as  wrongdoing.

Another example of the serial killer of this kind is Ahmad Suraj, who was nicknamed Datuk  and was also known as Nasib Kalewand. The Indonesian sorcerer Ahmad Suraj, desired to become a great healer, had killed 42 women aged from 11 to 30. The main difference between him and the murderers mentioned above was the fact that he was killing with some purpose, not because of the mere desire to kill. At least he thought so. Though most of psychologists would agree and do agree that his aspiration to kill appeared subconsciously.

It was heavy and viscous dream in which Ahmad was floundering in the swamp. And his father was walking and walking; then he occasionally stopped, put a finger to his lips again and started moving again. He obviously wanted to tell his son something, but could not do it immediately.

And only at the end, when Ahmad was about to wake up, his father brought him on a sugar cane plantation with human bodies sticking out of it.

The parent turned around, winked at his son and clearly said: “Seventy! Do you hear? Seventy! “

When he woke up, Ahmad had been tossing around in bed for a long time, wondering what his father had in mind. Maybe this is the age at which he finally reaches skills, he dreamed about all his life. And he dreamed of nothing less than the glory of the outstanding healer, well known all around the country, someone who would get appointments years ahead. But so far he could only dream about it: Ahmad Suraj had authority only over village girls and women, whom he treated for infertility, slander and evil eye. Ahmad could not cure even elementary diseases – he had neither necessary knowledge of doing it nor skills. And his age did not allow him to go anywhere to study – Ahmad was in his forties, when the deceased father appeared to him in a nightmare and “forced” to do something. But Ahmad was still wondering what his father wanted him to do.

One day, Ahmad was sitting in his house and reading a book about dreams when he gave attention to the fact that it was necessary to notice minor things in order to understand the meaning of the dreams, and just then you would get its main content. And obviously he was considering what could be called “minor things” in his dream. And maybe it was a part of an ancient magical ritual aimed at achieving power that the face of a woman buried in the ground should look towards her native village.

Ahmad did not believe himself; so that was the long-awaited key. He figured out that the father wanted him to sacrifice 70 women to the gods. Moreover, they should die the same way it had happened in his prophetic dream.

Having realized that, the village sorcerer began to lure women into sugar plantations, located in a remote place in North Sumatra. This abandoned land became a real “testing ground of death” for him.

In order to lure the woman into the wilderness, Ahmad resorted to a variety of methods. Sometimes he invited the patient, telling her about the cases of healing magic. The patients listened open-mouthed. One of the conditions was that no outsider had to know where the woman went. This was supposed to be a mystery to everyone. This was easy to put across due to the fact that most of the patients did not want anyone to know where they were going anyway. Furthermore, the Indonesian police found out that most of the women who sought the sorcerer’s help were prostitutes who wanted to become more sexually attractive to men, so the chances someone would be looking for them were extremely low. Naïve patients, who believed in the magical gift of an experienced sorcerer, also believed that burying in the ground will help in the treatment of infertility. The use of alternative medicine was pretty wide spread in Indonesia those days; in fact, it is pretty common in modern world even now, and the sorcerers can be found even in shopping malls… Therefore, people trust them, especially in rural regions.  So there was nothing unusual in the requirement of Datuk to burry half of a woman’s body to proceed to ritual. It was the easiest way to kill – the body of the victim was sunk into the ground, and there was nothing she could do. The warlock was walking around looking at the moon, muttering the words of a spell. The moon flooded the field with its warm light, the rustle of the trees weave in hushed words exhaled by Ahmad. The victims closed their eyes; they were immersed in the last dream, the dream with no exit from.

Seeing this, the sorcerer sneaked behind the victim and suffocated her to death with a piece of electrical cable. After a few moments, the victim started choking, her face became darker, and the foam appeared on her lips. This dark blood stained foam seemed to Suradji divine nectar, the latest emanation of life that was flying off. Kneeling, Ahmad pressed his lips to the blue mouth of the victim, licking pieces of foam from the trembling lips. And he was sure that the sour saliva of dying women gave him “new knowledge”, a new unstoppable force.

He had been committing his cruel crimes for 11 years. Sometimes the sorcerer could not lure the victim voluntarily. Then he stalked her and then killed. All these crimes, both the “voluntary” and those that sorcerer committed in a “sly” way, were carried out according to the same savage rite: the victims were covered by the ground, choked with a piece of the cable, and then  the body was buried so that the head of the killed one “was watching” his house.

After the woman died, Ahmad engulfed the body by the ground and walked home. The sudden disappearance of the village women for the time did not disturb anyone: Ahmad lived in wilderness, and the inhabitants of this province had other things to take care of.

But all of a sudden, muzzy because of his omnipotence the sorcerer decided that no one ever would find out. Having killed another woman, he buried her body next to his house. The neighbors saw it and told the police that Ahmad had dug a hole and thrown there something similar to the human body.

He was arrested in May 1997, after a terrible discovery – the police found the body of a woman not far from his home in the province of North Sumatra (North Sumatra). It was the neighbors who noticed something strange about someone well respected living next to them. They called the police reporting that their neighbor was burying the body at the back of his house. Unfortunately, they were not mistaken. In the first instance, Dakun confessed to committing 16 murders. But during the investigation, when new details were detected, the sorcerer confessed to committing 42 murders in total. However 80 families reported disappeared women aged from 11 to 30 at that time, so it might be more women who were unlucky enough to appeal for  the “help” of the sorcerer.  During interrogations, Ahmad explained that the victims themselves had turned to him for help on a variety of issues, believing in his supernatural magical abilities. According to Suradji, he was sure that such “rituals” had been increasing his magical power for the past 11 years.

Three of his wives, who, incidentally, were his sisters, were involved in the case together with Ahmad. The women were accused of aiding and abetting murders, as well as getting rid of the corpses. One of the convicted spouses was prosecuted. Indonesian court also imposed a death sentence for her. However, at the last moment it was replaced by the life imprisonment. Ahmad Suradji was sentenced to death by firing squad despite the appeal from human-rights group Amnesty International. The sentence was executed on July 10, 2008.